Projects Report

This report shows the various collaborative projects between UNO and the community. Various filters are provided to gain a better understanding of how different UNO units collaborate with the community.

Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type: Faculty Research
Start Semester: Spring
End Semester: Summer
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year: 2021-22
Topics:

Description: "This project proposes a new partnership between the Nebraska Commission on Indian Affairs, which represents the four tribes of Nebraska: Omaha Tribe, Ponca Tribe, Santee Sioux Tribe, and Winnebago Tribe, as well as other Native persons living on and off tribal lands in Nebraska, and the researchers at the University of Nebraska, Omaha. The research team will conduct a pilot study involving the collection of preliminary data and secondary data analysis on the topics of murdered and/or missing Native women and children. Specifically, the proposed collaboration will include secondary analysis of quantitative data (e.g., law enforcement data [LE], data from the Nebraska’s Missing Persons Database, the Center for Missing and Exploited Children, the Children’s Bureau) as well as collection and analysis of qualitative data from key informants (e.g., tribal leaders and community members; state, local, and tribal LE; tribal and non-tribal victim service providers) to: (1) identify the scope and context of missing American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women and children in Nebraska, (2) identify the scope and context of murdered AI/AN women and children in Nebraska, (3) identify both challenges and promising practices regarding reporting and investigating missing and/or murdered Native American women and children in Nebraska, and (4) generate data-driven recommendations for developing and strengthening partnerships to increase opportunities for justice and support for Nebraska’s Native women, children, and families. In addition to delivering important, actionable information to Nebraska’s tribal communities, tribal and non-tribal LE, victim service providers, court systems, and legislators, the proposed collaboration will also provide a replicable model for other states to complete their own comparable research to improve responses for what is perceived as a significant public health problem. ""Note: This project contains a research and/or development component, as defined in applicable law,"" and complies with Part 200 Uniform Requirements - 2 CFR 200.210(a)(14). CA/NCF"
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Alternatives to Detention (ATDs) are programs that increase supervision on a youth rather than placing the youth in a secure facility while awaiting their court hearings (prejudicated youth). Youth in these programs are allowed to remain in the community with the ATD intervention to help prevent them from committing new law violations and make sure that the youth appear in court. ATDs include electronic monitor, tracking services, day and evening reporting centers and shelter care. Electronic monitor (EM) programs use electronic devices, usually worn on the youth’s ankle, that monitors their location and movement centered around their home, allowing them to go to school, jobs, activities, etc. as approved by the personal monitoring their movement.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Day and Evening Reporting Centers are programs held at a specific location that provide intensive supervision for youth during the school hours for youth not in school and/or the afterschool hours. Programs may offer only day reporting, evening reporting, or both day and evening reporting for youth. Reporting centers use structured actives and classes that focus on needs and/or skills such as anger management, job skills, independent living, etc. Reporting centers do not provide treatment services. The goal of the reporting center is that youth will return to court with no new law violations.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Assessment programs are a Direct Service program - a program that meets with a youth a few times to conduct a singular service, in this case, to evaluate the youth to identify mental health and/or behavioral risks and needs. Programs may use any number of different assessment tools to assess the risks and needs of the youth and provide recommendations for services for prevention and intervention. Under Assessment programs are also Assessment Centers, which are a location where staff can meet with youth to complete the evaluations, and Referral Services, which are agencies that help youth and families find services within their communities based on their assessed needs.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Assessment programs are a Direct Service program - a program that meets with a youth a few times to conduct a singular service, in this case, to evaluate the youth to identify mental health and/or behavioral risks and needs. Referral Services are agencies that help youth and families find services within their communities based on their assessed needs.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Assessment programs are a Direct Service program - a program that meets with a youth a few times to conduct a singular service, in this case, to evaluate the youth to identify mental health and/or behavioral risks and needs. Referral Services are agencies that help youth and families find services within their communities based on their assessed needs.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Crisis Response programs are made up of teams of individuals trained to intervene in cases where youth’s health or safety is threatened, resolve serious conflicts between parent/guardians and the youth regarding the youth’s conduct or disregard for authority, or runaway behavior. Law enforcement notifies Crisis Response teams when they are called to a location where there is a situation as mentioned above, and the staff/team works with the youth and their family/those involved in the situation to come to a solution the make sure the youth and others are safe. The solution can include creating a safety plan with the youth and family, services being provided to the youth and family to keep the youth at home, and/or the youth being places outside of the home. The Crisis Response staff/team can also recommend services within the community to address the needs of the youth/family as part of the resolution process, and follow-up with the family if needed. Crisis Respite falls under Crisis Response programs, and is a temporary placement for a youth outside of the home to provide relief for parents or caregivers. This is not an extended placement.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Diversion programs are programs aimed at diverting low-risk youth with minor law violations from the juvenile system who would otherwise have charges filed or be adjudicated. The county attorney grants diversion for youth after considering the youth’s age, the nature of the offense, the youth’s history and future risk, and the recommendation of the referring agency. When a youth is granted diversion, the diversion officer should tailor a program for the youth based on the youth’s specific needs and areas he/she needs to focus on. If diversion is completed successfully, the youth’s charges are either dismissed or not filed in court.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Diversion programs are programs aimed at diverting low-risk youth with minor law violations from the juvenile system who would otherwise have charges filed or be adjudicated. The county attorney grants diversion for youth after considering the youth’s age, the nature of the offense, the youth’s history and future risk, and the recommendation of the referring agency. When a youth is granted diversion, the diversion officer should tailor a program for the youth based on the youth’s specific needs and areas he/she needs to focus on. If diversion is completed successfully, the youth’s charges are either dismissed or not filed in court.
Engagement Type: Engaged Research
Activity Type:
Start Semester: Summer
End Semester:
Start Academic Year: 2020-21
End Academic Year:
Topics: Juvenile/Adult Justice System

Description: Family Support Programs are community-based services that help to promote the well-being of children and families as well as increase the strength and stability of families. The services can be for youth and/or parents, and can occur within the home or at community locations. There are 4 sub-types of family support programs: Parenting Class, Advocacy, Social Workers, and Family Support. Advocacy Programs help guide youth and/or their families through the juvenile justice system, explaining the process and importance of each hearing, outcome, or decision. Advocates may meet with youth and families at their home prior to court appearances to discuss the purpose of the hearing or what the consequences of not appearing in court may be. Advocates can also accompany youth and families to the proceedings.
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